The Miami Hotline meets Angels and Demons – God’s Trigger Review

Dennaton Games production fans have no reason to be satisfied. It is not expected that the third part of Hotline Miami will hit the market. No wonder many of them took God’s Trigger on the radar. The production of Polish One More Level is quite an interesting story. Initially, the game was to tell the story of a priest fighting crime with weapons and cartridges. After a long period of silence, the project returned with a new pair of main characters and Techland as the publisher. However, religious motives remained in place. In God’s Trigger we finally play the fallen angel Harry and Judah, who represents Hell for a change. They both descend to the surface of the Earth to prevent the destruction of humanity. Can they stop the Horsemen of the Apocalypse? The answer is quite obvious. So it’s better to ask how much they will smash opponents along the way, cause explosions and how much fun it will give.

To have it behind me I’ll start with history. A religious motif plays an important role in the game, but unfortunately only on paper. If the angel were replaced by a gangster and the Riders of the Apocalypse were replaced by drug barons, no one would notice the difference. You just have to somehow justify the special powers of the characters. Of course, no depth of history is sought in such games. After all, the creators could use the envelope much better. Instead, the motif of a fallen angel and a rebellious demon at most plays the role of a skin that could very well be exchanged for anything else. It does not affect visited locations, dialogues or the course of the mission. The Horsemen of the Apocalypse themselves have their own characteristics and something interesting can be created around them. This, unfortunately, is missing in God’s Trigger. Maybe it was better to stay with an armed priest. At least, cooperation with Techland would put some flavors in the game, obviously associated with the famous clergyman with revolvers from Call of Juarez.

Creme de la creme God’s Trigger, however, is mechanics. The easiest way to compare it to the brilliant Miami Hotline. The action is shown in an isometric view. Quite specific because the camera is exactly 90 degrees. Similar to Dennaton Games, One More Level also decided on a specific approach to shooting. There is not much ammunition, we have to pick up a new weapon every now and then, and one shell is enough to kill. Enemy and protagonist. Here, however, the main difference appears between God’s Trigger and Hotline Miami. Polish production is much simpler and focuses more on spectacular action and pure pleasure from the game than the challenge. Opponents do not converge from adjacent rooms after hearing a shot and there are not so many. Most importantly, there are many more checkpoints in the game. Death at Hotline Miami cost a lot because it meant a return to the beginning of the board. In God’s Trigger, we only go back a bit. So if someone bounced off the difficulty level in Dennaton Games, the production of One More Level will be a great solution.

However, there are more differences in gameplay. The Miami Hotline is very sterile gameplay. Under this unusual term lies the idea of ​​eliminating absolutely everything that is not mandatory in the game. So there are no skills, puzzles, dexterity elements or diversification. Just a hero, a weapon with a few bullets and lots of deadly opponents. God’s Trigger tries to diversify this formula in many ways. So, small logic puzzles or dexterity elements appear in the game. For example, there is a level to play at which we cannot be detected and there is more stealth than direct combat. One More Level did their best to make their production not as minimalist as Hotline Miami. To some extent it certainly succeeded.

Creme de la creme God’s Trigger, however, is mechanics. The easiest way to compare it to the brilliant Miami Hotline. The action is shown in an isometric view. Quite specific because the camera is exactly 90 degrees. Similar to Dennaton Games, One More Level also decided on a specific approach to shooting. There is not much ammunition, we have to pick up a new weapon every now and then, and one shell is enough to kill. Enemy and protagonist. Here, however, the main difference appears between God’s Trigger and Hotline Miami. Polish production is much simpler and focuses more on spectacular action and pure pleasure from the game than the challenge. Opponents do not converge from adjacent rooms after hearing a shot and there are not so many. Most importantly, there are many more checkpoints in the game. Death at Hotline Miami cost a lot because it meant a return to the beginning of the board. In God’s Trigger, we only go back a bit. So if someone bounced off the difficulty level in Dennaton Games, the production of One More Level will be a great solution.
However, there are more differences in gameplay. The Miami Hotline is very sterile gameplay. Under this unusual term lies the idea of ​​eliminating absolutely everything that is not mandatory in the game. So there are no skills, puzzles, dexterity elements or diversification. Just a hero, a weapon with a few bullets and lots of deadly opponents. God’s Trigger tries to diversify this formula in many ways. So, small logic puzzles or dexterity elements appear in the game. For example, there is a level to play at which we cannot be detected and there is more stealth than direct combat. One More Level did their best to make their production not as minimalist as Hotline Miami. To some extent it certainly succeeded.

The Hotline Miami is difficult because it primarily checks accuracy and reflexes. I don’t forget to think, too, because it’s often cleverness, not monkey dexterity, that is the key to success. However, there are difficult games, but giving the player a multitude of options. It is the skillful use of many mechanics that allows you to achieve success. Such a production could be God’s Trigger. However, the game does not have a difficulty level, and the only one available is not a big challenge. One More Level has not decided to check the player’s skills. There’s nothing wrong with it. Unnecessarily, however, the game offers so much skill, because its design gives no reason to use them. The only thing it does is unnecessarily complicates the control. God’s Trigger has an Arcade mode in which the difficulty level is more similar to that of Hotline Miami. There you can actually combine. However, this is only an additional mode, in addition with a relatively small number of boards.


However, you have to give the One More Level team that the main mechanics are a lot of fun. Destroying the enemy with a shotgun may not be as improperly satisfying as in Hotline Miami, but it still gives a lot of pleasure. God’s Trigger works fantastic in the most important thing. It is a pity that the construction of levels was not always able to fully use the potential of mechanics. For example, the first chapter was great, because I felt that I was moving in a real location. The second one is bland mazes full of cleaning rooms. Boss battles were also a great disappointment. They showed a total lack of ideas for something interesting, original and fully exploiting the game’s mechanics. The summit was the final duel, which in no way kept you in suspense, but only required the mechanical execution of simple movements. The game also did not signal that in one of the phases (half of the fight) it is necessary to use both characters (people who will play alone can treat it as a small hint).

The tone of this review may not be very optimistic because I complained about God’s Trigger in many places. However, I think it’s a great game that I recommend to every fan of fast and spectacular action. Smashing enemies, no matter if they are firearms or swords, is a lot of satisfaction. So if I complain about something, it’s designer decisions, which instead of exposing the greatest advantages of the game, only distracted him. It was not even necessary to add such a number of skills. There were also some more interesting ideas that could replace unsuccessful boss fights or sometimes poor level design. The Miami Hotline focused on minimalism and it succeeded. God’s Trigger was to have everything more, better and more effectively. However, this is not always the best way.

There were many comparisons to Hotline Miami in this text, because both games are very close to each other. God’s Trigger is unfortunately not better in this combination. However, this is no reason to delete this game. On the contrary, I absolutely recommend checking out the One More Level title. These minuses wasted more potential than they actually disturbed the game. Fighting, alone or in cooperation *, works very well. You could squeeze much more from this game, but it’s still a pretty good title. Enough that it would be worth spending money on it now.

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